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Common Injuries and Side Effects Linked to the HPV Vaccine

Introduced in 2006, the HPV vaccine prevents against infection with nine types of human papillomaviruses (HPV). Most human papillomavirus infections go unnoticed and clear up within two years, but some can cause genital cancer in both men and women alike. That’s why the HPV vaccine contains nine types of human papillomaviruses most likely to cause cancer: 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.

The HPV vaccine is now recommended for females age 9 to 45 and for males age 11 to 26. While it is effective, the HPV can and does cause adverse reactions and injuries, including shoulder injuries (SIRVA), Vasovagal Syncope, Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM), allergic reactions, and other injuries.

If you or a loved one has been injured by the HPV vaccine, you may be entitled to compensation from a federal fund called the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund.

INJURIES AND REACTIONS CAUSED BY HPV VACCINES

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, such as Gardasil 9, has been frequently connected with the following adverse side effects, injuries, and reactions:

  • Shoulder Injuries Related to Vaccine Administration (SIRVA), including Bursitis, Tendonitis, Adhesive Capsulitis (Frozen Shoulder Syndrome), and Rotator Cuff Injuries
  • Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM)
  • Vasovagal Syncope (sudden fainting)
  • Anaphylaxis (allergic reactions)

THOSE UNDER AGE 45 AT A GREATER RISK OF HPV VACCINE INJURIES

Right now, the HPV shot is recommended for females between the ages of 9 and 45 and for males between the ages of 11 and 26. Therefore, women under the age of 45 and men under the age of 26 are most at risk of developing an HPV vaccine injury while they receive two or three doses of the vaccine. The Centers for Disease Control recommends that people are vaccinated for HPV as soon as possible. Children under the age of 14 only need two doses of the HPV vaccine over the course of a year. Men between ages 14 and

26 and women between ages 14 and 45 must get three doses of the HPV shot over a six month period for the vaccine to be effective.

COMPENSATION IS AVAILABLE FOR HPV VACCINE REACTIONS

If you or a loved one has suffered from an HPV vaccine injury in the last three (3) years, you may be eligible for compensation from the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

If you would like to learn more, please call us at 312-578-9501. You can also contact us by filling out the form below. Our consultations are always free, and our representation comes at no cost to our clients when handling HPV vaccine injury cases. The attorneys at Shannon Law Group, P.C. can represent any living in the United States as well.